Connect with others who understand.

sign up log in
About MyOvarianCancerTeam

Advanced Ovarian Cancer Treatment Complications

Posted on July 09, 2021
Medically reviewed by
Howard Goodman, M.D.
Article written by
Kristopher Bunting, M.D.

Advanced ovarian cancer is treatable, but some of the treatments can have long-lasting complications and side effects. Ovarian cancer is considered advanced when it has spread beyond the ovaries or fallopian tubes, as in stage 2, stage 3, and stage 4. Specific treatments selected for ovarian cancer vary based on several factors including the type, stage, and grade of the tumor as well as a person’s age, overall health, and other medical conditions.

Ovarian Cancer Treatments

The treatment options for ovarian cancer usually involve a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, or hormone therapy. Radiation therapy is also sometimes used. Additionally, new experimental treatments are always being developed and may be available through clinical trials. Each of these treatments is important for removing or destroying cancer cells, but they each also carry risks for long-term complications.

Surgery

Surgery for ovarian cancer may include removal of one or both ovaries (oophorectomy), fallopian tubes (salpingectomy), uterus (hysterectomy), lymph nodes, and other affected tissues and organs. Debulking surgery may also be used to decrease the size of the tumor before chemotherapy.

Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer includes intravenous (through a vein) or intraperitoneal (into the abdomen) administration of a variety of chemotherapy drugs. Chemotherapy may be given before surgery (neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and after surgery (adjuvant chemotherapy).

Targeted Therapy

Targeted therapy for ovarian cancer may include medications called angiogenesis inhibitors, immunotherapy, PARP inhibitors, and TRK inhibitors, depending on the type of ovarian cancer.

Hormone Therapy

Hormone therapy for ovarian cancer may include drugs that block the production of estrogen or that block the effects of estrogen on cells.

Radiation Therapy

Radiation is not commonly used to treat most ovarian cancers, but sometimes localized radiation (the use of high-energy beams to kill cancer cells) may be used.

Clinical Trials

New treatments are tested in clinical trials and may include new chemotherapy drugs, chemotherapy combinations, and targeted therapy. The risks involved in clinical trials may be the same as current treatments, but there may also be additional potential complications.

Complications of Ovarian Cancer Treatments

Treatments for ovarian cancer come with several potential complications.

Common Complications of Chemotherapy Treatment

Chemotherapy involves killing rapidly growing cancer cells, but it also affects healthy cells that undergo constant growth, such as the hair follicles, cells in the bone marrow that make blood cells, and the lining of the digestive tract. Many side effects seen with different types of cancer therapy can be due to impaired bone marrow function, which can cause low blood cell counts. Low blood cell counts can lead to:

  • Increased infections
  • Impaired wound healing
  • Increased bleeding
  • Fatigue

Other common side effects of chemotherapy include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Mouth sores
  • Hair loss
  • Itchy skin rashes
  • Symptoms similar to an allergic reaction

Many of these side effects go away once treatment is finished, but some may persist long after therapy.

Infertility and Early Menopause

Infertility (the inability to get pregnant) and the early onset of menopause are common complications of ovarian cancer treatment, especially in advanced cases. Both fertility and the menstrual cycle require normal function of the ovaries to produce estrogen and progesterone.

Surgical removal of both ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) or the uterus (hysterectomy) always results in infertility. Chemotherapy and hormone treatment may also cause infertility even if the uterus and one ovary are intact, as is the case in some types of early-stage ovarian cancer. Early menopause (the end of menstruation) may result from removal of the ovaries, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy. Talk to your health care team about ways to address fertility issues.

Other Surgical Complications

When ovarian cancer has spread to other abdominal organs, portions of those organs may be removed. After removing tissue from the bladder, a urinary catheter may be required to allow the bladder to heal. If a portion of the intestines is removed, a colostomy may be needed.

Abdominal Adhesions

Any abdominal surgery can result in the development of abdominal adhesions. These adhesions are internal scar tissue that can form on internal organs (such as the intestines, bladder, uterus, and liver) and can cause pain, bloating, and bowel obstruction. Severe adhesions may require additional surgery to treat.

Fluid Buildup and Swelling

Ascites, the collection of fluid in the abdomen, can occur after surgery or chemotherapy for ovarian cancer. Ascites can cause bloating, nausea, pain, and shortness of breath. Excessive ascites fluid may need to be drained using a procedure called paracentesis.

Edema, collection of fluid in the extremities, is a common complication of surgical removal of lymph nodes in the pelvis and abdomen. Fluid that is normally drained by the lymphatic system can build up in the feet and legs, leading to swelling and pain.

Bladder Irritation and Bleeding

Bleeding and irritation of the lining of the bladder can occur with the chemotherapy drug Mitoxana (ifosfamide).

Bone Marrow Damage and Secondary Cancer

In rare instances, long-lasting damage to the bone marrow from chemotherapy can result in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia, a blood cancer.

Cognitive Impairment

Also sometimes called “chemo brain,” long-term cognitive impairment can develop after chemotherapy. Chemo brain involves problems with memory, concentration, and the ability to learn new things. Treatments are available to help improve cognitive function.

Hearing Loss

The chemotherapy drug cisplatin may cause nerve damage that can lead to loss of hearing and dizziness.

Kidney Damage

Chemotherapy with cisplatin may also result in long-term kidney damage. However, kidney damage is usually prevented by giving adequate amounts of intravenous (IV) fluids.

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is the loss of bone mass that can occur as a result of old age, cancer, or hormone therapy. Osteoporosis can lead to an increased risk of broken bones, but it can be treated with supplementary calcium and vitamin D, or other drugs that help to preserve bone mass.

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is nerve damage that causes numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. Some types of chemotherapy can lead to nerve damage.

Sexual Dysfunction

Surgery, chemotherapy, and hormone treatment can result in sexual dysfunction, including a loss of sex drive, pain, and difficulty achieving arousal and orgasm.

Knowledge Is Power

Knowing what to expect from your treatment can better prepare you to face the challenges that lie ahead. Consider the risks and benefits of various treatments when working with your oncologist to develop a treatment plan that addresses your concerns and desired outcomes. Palliative care to address side effects and complications of treatment can also lead to a better quality of life.

Talk With Others Who Understand

MyOvarianCancerTeam is the social network for people with ovarian cancer and their loved ones. Members come together to ask questions, give advice, and share their stories with others who understand life with ovarian cancer.

Are you or someone you care for living with ovarian cancer? Share your experience in the comments below, or start a conversation by posting on MyOvarianCancerTeam.

All updates must be accompanied by text or a picture.
Howard Goodman, M.D. is certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and specializes in the surgical management of women with gynecologic cancer. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.. Learn more about him here.
Kristopher Bunting, M.D. studied chemistry and life sciences at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, and received his doctor of medicine degree from Tulane University. Learn more about him here.

Related articles

Cancer of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or peritoneum (lining of the abdomen) is hard to detect...

How To Manage Lymph Nodes In Ovarian Cancer

Cancer of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or peritoneum (lining of the abdomen) is hard to detect...
Researchers are constantly working to discover new therapies for ovarian cancer, fallopian tube...

Is Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Available? What We Know

Researchers are constantly working to discover new therapies for ovarian cancer, fallopian tube...
Although ovarian cancer can be treated in different ways, surgery is the main part of the...

Types of Ovarian Cancer Surgery: What To Expect

Although ovarian cancer can be treated in different ways, surgery is the main part of the...
The type and stage of an ovarian stromal tumor are the main factors influencing treatment....

Ovarian Stromal Tumor Treatment

The type and stage of an ovarian stromal tumor are the main factors influencing treatment....
If you have ovarian cancer, you may be curious about how vitamin D may affect your condition and...

Vitamin D and Ovarian Cancer: Benefits and Uses

If you have ovarian cancer, you may be curious about how vitamin D may affect your condition and...
The goal of maintenance treatments for ovarian cancer is to delay relapse — the return of cancer...

How Do Ovarian Cancer Maintenance Treatments Work?

The goal of maintenance treatments for ovarian cancer is to delay relapse — the return of cancer...

Recent articles

A person’s risk of developing ovarian cancer is generally low. However, the condition is often...

Assessing Your Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors

A person’s risk of developing ovarian cancer is generally low. However, the condition is often...
Cancer of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and peritoneum (lining of the abdomen) is collectively...

Ovarian Cancer and Pregnancy — Diagnosis and Next Steps

Cancer of the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and peritoneum (lining of the abdomen) is collectively...
Several factors affect a person’s likelihood of developing ovarian cancer. Some characteristics,...

Ovarian Cancer Prevention: How To Lower Your Risk

Several factors affect a person’s likelihood of developing ovarian cancer. Some characteristics,...
Among the three main types of ovarian cancer, epithelial ovarian cancer is by far the most common...

What You Need To Know About Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prognosis

Among the three main types of ovarian cancer, epithelial ovarian cancer is by far the most common...
When a doctor diagnoses a person’s cancer in its early stages, they’ll have more treatment...

Ovarian Cancer Screening Options and Their Limitations

When a doctor diagnoses a person’s cancer in its early stages, they’ll have more treatment...
Doctors use several diagnostic tests, including blood tests, in order to look for signs of...

My Blood Test Results Are Normal. Can It Really Be Ovarian Cancer?

Doctors use several diagnostic tests, including blood tests, in order to look for signs of...
MyOvarianCancerTeam My ovarian cancer Team

Thank you for signing up.

close